Tim Chermak is the CEO and founder of Platform Marketing. In this two-part installment, Tim joins Isaac to talk about how Tim dropped out of college and launched his career helping small businesses with marketing and turned that opportunity into a thriving company, Platform Marketing.

Topics:

  • The first step Tim took to starting his career.
  • Realizing he wasn’t interested in finance
  • The difference between what he learned in marketing classes and what he learned on his own from marketing blogs, books, and seminars
  • Lessons learned starting his career

Links:

Visit Platform Marketing for more info about how to work with Tim.

Listen:

Also listen to this on iTunes, Spotify, Anchor, TuneIn, and Overcast.

Full Transcript:

Isaac
Welcome to Career Crashers, where we tell the stories of those who are not content to wait around following rules and hoping for good things to happen. Great careers aren’t found. They’re forged.

It’s time to crash the party.

All right, today on Career Crashers, I’m talking to my friend, Tim Chermac. Tim is the founder and CEO of Platform Marketing, and an all around awesome guy. Tim, good to talk to you, man.

Tim
Hey Isaac, it’s good to be here.

Isaac
So your career, you had no college degree or any fancy credentials. You kind of found a unusual way to get started. Can you talk a little bit about what were the first things you did when you decided okay, I, you know, you work jobs as a teenager or whatever, but yeah, I got to start a career, like, get real about this. What did you do first?

Tim
Right. So the last time I actually ever applied for a job where I sent in a resume or filled out any sort of application whatsoever, was in high school. After I think my last, like my last real W-2 job was working for like $7 an hour Best Buy, I think. That was when I was a junior in high school. After that, I went to college, bounced around at some online schools, and I was studying actually economics, finance, it was my major. And I realized during my junior year, I’m kind of on the fast track to be an investment banker, and my future looks like you know, moving to New York City, and working for a company at Goldman Sachs, which which can be awesome. Lots of people love that. I thought I did, because what I did when I was a freshman in college was I went on Google, and I typed in highest paying jobs out of college. And that’s what made me decide, oh, I guess I’ll be an investment banker, because all I cared about at the time was like, how can I make you know, $80,000 a year in my 20s. I didn’t put much more thought into it than that.

By the time I was a junior, I had taken some of those classes, I realized, there is no way that I want to move to a place like New York or LA, or really anywhere and work in a finance job. That’s just not me. I hate numbers. I hate math. I hate everything about that. But I was tolerating it because I thought it would pay a lot. And so I basically cut my losses. My junior year, I decided to drop out of school and basically figure out what I wanted to do. My parents were devastated but because it’s like, “Hey, you have one year left, just finished, you idiot,” you know.

But I had an inkling this whole time that I kind of enjoyed marketing. I like advertising, marketing, persuasion, convincing people to do things, I was always very persua sive. And actually, my parents tried to get me to go to law school, at first, because they thought, “you’d be such a good lawyer.”

Isaac
I wrote an article one time called stop telling good arguers to be lawyers, because it’s such a common thing. Like you’re really good at arguing and you like to debate and people are like, you should be a lawyer, which, you know, like, why would you want to do divorce and merger and acquisition paperwork all day?

Tim
Yeah, people in my family actually just assumed I was going to go to law school. But I definitely was not interested in that. And I was kind of drawn to marketing. And this is like before the age of really what we would consider digital online marketing. So this is like before Facebook really even existed or Twitter or, you know, Snapchat, Instagram, any of that. But I was interested in marketing.

And so I was reading a bunch like Seth Godin books, even when I was in college, and I decided to drop out. And I’m just going to give this a go. I bought some books on Amazon I could find on marketing, went to Barnes and Noble and bought books on marketing, and just tried to self-teach myself as much as I could, because in the in the few marketing classes I had taken in college, they didn’t, they didn’t really teach you anything. It was about like, hey, the four P’s of marketing: price, product, promotion, I don’t even know what all of them are, and I have a marketing company now it shows you how irrelevant most of that is. And by the way, when I say have a marketing company, we have like 20 plus full time employees. So I don’t want people watching this to think that it’s like me and a part time assistant in the Philippines.

Isaac
Tim is legit. He’s got, he’s got something real here.

Tim
Yeah, the only reason I say that, not to sound arrogant, is that like when I talk about how unimportant what you learned in school is, like the four P’s and all that, I’m running a marketing company now, and I can’t even tell you what I learned in like the freshman marketing courses. And so I knew that that wasn’t going to get me a job in marketing or career in marketing.

Isaac
What was the difference, so you went and read a lot of books and self educated. What was the difference in the stuff that you learned on your own? Why was that more effective than just, like, taking whatever your classes, marketing classes, were in college?

Tim
Well, it was it was immediately practical, because if someone’s gonna write something down in a book, or frankly, even a blog post online, it better be valuable to the person reading it, or else they’re never going to go back to that blog again, or if it’s an author and it’s, you know, a book I bought at Barnes and Noble on marketing, I’m never going to read any books from that author again if I didn’t actually think it was valuable.

Isaac
It’s almost like you have to be good at marketing your ideas about marketing when you’re in the market. And in college textbook you don’t really have to.

Tim
And so you know, eventually I read, I don’t know, 10, 20 books on marketing. I scrounged up some money and attended a couple of, like, marketing seminars, you know, and I mean, I was maxing out my credit cards at the time. I remember going to one conference where I actually fasted for two and a half, three full days.

Isaac
And that was before, like, keto and, like, intermittent fasting was…

Tim
It was, it was before all that was a thing it was just like, “Tim literally does not have money for food.” So on the last day, they had like one of those catered lunches that was like paid for by one of the sponsors. And I went to lunch because I hadn’t eaten in two and a half days. So like I was going to these conferences with no money. Just planning, well, I spent all my money on the flight and the hotel room getting like the Spirit Airlines overnight red eye flight, and just having no money for food. So that’s how much I wanted to learn. But I ended up just going door to door to small businesses in my hometown back up in central Minnesota. So I’m talking, like, small businesses, right, like used car dealerships, dentists, local financial planners, real estate agents.

Isaac
And what was your pitch to them?

Tim
I basically just walked in to the front door, and whoever was at the front door, I’d be like, “Hi, my name is Tim. Can I speak to the owner? Can I speak to the manager?” And they’d be like, “What?” They kind of didn’t know what to say, it’s just such a weird question, you know, and they’re like, do you have an appointment? And I was like, “Oh, no, I don’t, but I have some marketing ideas that I thought they should know about.”

And that was it.

And so they’d be like, “Okay.” And then they’d go grab him or her if the person was available. But usually they weren’t. And they said, “Okay, cool. I’ll take down your information. I’ll have you know, have them email you.”

Isaac
You didn’t go in asking them to do you a favor right away. You went in saying, “I’ve got some ideas that I want to give to you,” as you’re sort of first ask?

Tim
Yes. And so what what I did ahead of time as I had typed up a one or two page kind of marketing plan with which I mean really isn’t just a bunch of bullet points. I don’t want to make it sound any more complicated than it really was, at the time I was 21. So it’s like a college aged kid walk in to these businesses saying, “Hey, I want to talk to the owner, I have some marketing ideas.” One, one element that may have worked for me was most adults erroneously think that young people automatically are smart on online media marketing. So sure, this young kid probably can teach us and stuff about social media,

Isaac
There was that great window when social media was really, really new. And companies were just like, if you were like, under, you know, 25, they would just assume you knew what you were doing?

Tim
Like, right? Like, “were you born after 1990? Come join our social media team!”

Isaac
Yeah.

Tim
So you know, these, these small business owners were willing to give me a meeting. And I would type up more robust marketing plan, and I was quoting them prices, you know, like a couple $1,000, hire me. And they’ll build out this robust marketing plan that now I mean, like, looking back at some of those plans, I would never do any of that stuff for less than like, $20,000. I mean, I was talking about, “Hey, I’ll help you launch a magazine. I’ll help you launch a podcast. I’ll, you know, build an email follow up sequence for you. I’ll build out Facebook ads,” and all this stuff that I had just self taught my myself how to do. And over 10 of them, the first ones all said no, so I just got no, no, no, no.

And often it was getting, Isaac, to like the second or third meeting where they were basically, in hindsight, they were like, leading me on just trying to pump me for all this information. And then eventually, when it came time to like, “hey, do you want to pay me $2,000?” No, they’re like, no, this really doesn’t fit in our budget right now, but thanks. So I was getting crushed. Time after time. Finally, someone said said yes. And they didn’t have any money to pay me. But they’re like, “Yeah, can you do this, we have no money to pay you.” And so that kind of was a crash course in negotiation. Because I realized, “Oh, I need an opportunity. I need to get my foot in the door. I need, you know, a case study of anything.” But they have no money to pay me.

And so it was a real estate agent. And we worked out like a revenue sharing deal, which I learned later was illegal. Because you’re not allowed to accept a commission for real estate sales, if you’re not licensed as a real estate agent in that state.

Isaac
This is why by the way, people were like, Oh, I have a business idea or whatever. The first thing I got to do is like go file paperwork, lookup legal stuff, that’s terrible. Just start selling it because the more you know, the less likely you are to actually do it. And your your ignorance is actually an advantage early on, you just need to start trying stuff.

Tim
Totally. So I mean, I found that out after I had made 10s of 1000s of dollars doing this that technically my entire business model of charging a percentage of sales was illegal, but I had no business cards. So I’m like a marketing professional, right. I’m 21 no business cards, no website. No, no like literature. I’m handing out no brochures. The one thing I did have was in my mind, I was like, you know, professional business people have suitcases or not suitcases they have briefcases right. And so I shit you not, the the night before my first meeting, I went to Office Max in my town. And I bought like a whatever it was $40, $50 briefcase was the cheapest briefcase that looked like leather. And because I was like, I have to carry a briefcase into this meeting, just so these people take me seriously, because I’m 21 years old. And then I thought, Wait, what do like adults even put in briefcases? I don’t know, I’ve only seen madmen.

Isaac
Some juice boxes and rice-krispies treats?

Tim
Right. So I like bought some like yellow pad, you know, legal notebooks and some pens, and I would type up my marketing, but I totally did not need to carry any of that in, but I walked in with a briefcase, and they would see me walking with it. And then I would set it down, you know, on the floor next to me, you know, by the chair, and they’d be like, oh, wow, you came prepared. And then at no point in any of those meetings did I ever open my briefcase. So that’s how I thoughtyou would go about getting clients.

Isaac
By the way, it’s pretty awesome that your expertise and clientele for platform, you’re in the real estate market, realtors are your clients after that being your first client. So I want to go down, I’ve pulled a couple I just writing some notes, I got a couple of bullet points that I think are great lessons from your career crash story.

First, self investment, you’ve invested a ton in yourself, you just go out and buy books you go to wherever you can to get the knowledge, even if you have no money for food, it’s worth it to invest in yourself. And, Tim, I know you do this to this day. I mean, you’re just you’re reading, if there’s someone that you can meet that’s valuable to you, you’re on a plane.

Another point is you gave before you asked, you went and said I’ve got something valuable for you before you said can you give me something. Another point, you did research on these businesses to come up with ideas specific to them. Another one that I think is underlooked, is overlooked rather, you were a you were able to be a big fish in a small pond because you were you are going after small town small businesses that it’s not worth most big agencies time to go after it. And so you didn’t have a lot of competition. You started somewhere where it was easy. And then the final point…

Tim
And and that’s that’s actually, to this day, what we do a Platform, our marketing agency, is we’re kind of a big fish in a small pond in that in the real estate marketing space, there’s tons of you know, companies that are worth 10s of millions, hundreds of millions of dollars. We’re not we’re much smaller than that. But they work with an unlimited amount of real estate agents in a market.

So I know Isaac, you’re in Charleston, South Carolina. Um, you know, there’s companies that might work with 20, 25, 50 agents in Charleston. That’s not very attractive from the real estate agents perspective. Because if 40 other agents in their backyard are using the same marketing system, it’s almost by definition, not very effective. We decided early on, hey, we’re going to be a smaller company. But we’re only going to work with one agent per market. And so that immediately makes us different, because to my knowledge, we’ve been doing this like five years now. But we’re the only marketing company in our industry that does that. So we kind of created a category of one we are big fish in a small pond. It’s a really small pond. It’s more like a bathtub, because we’re the only one that fits in it.

Isaac
The final point I was going to bring up, which I think is really powerful. You said, the prices you were charging, you’d never do now because it was like way too little for all the stuff. And eventually, you didn’t charge anything for that first client at first. And I think that the power you have when you’re first getting started on launch in your career is you have a very low opportunity costs, right? Like, what else were you going to be doing? You didn’t have other things that you could have been doing that could have earned you dramatically more right away, or at least not that were as interesting. And so the ability to work for free to pitch yourself for cheap. That is a huge advantage. That’s not something to be afraid of, or feel ashamed of that your prices are low. Like just get in and get started. I think that’s a great illustration of that.

Tim, thanks for giving us a little bit of the story. Do you think I can get another episode out of you? Because I want you to tell me a story about one of your employees if you’re up for it.

Tim
Yes, yes, that’d be fun.

Isaac
All right.

Like what you hear? Go to crash.co and join the career revolution. Do you want to share your own career crash story? Send it directly to me at isaac@crash.co.


From High School to Full-time Marketer with Tim Chermak

In this episode, Tim Chermak shares the story of how he decided to hire a young employee, Elisheva Hinkle, at the start of her career.

This story shows how to separate yourself from the pack and get noticed when you’re looking for opportunities–and it’s not about connections or an impressive resume.

Topics:

  • Using creativity to make an impression to a company
  • Offering to work for free for a trial period
  • Getting specific about how you can create value for a company
  • Most companies are looking for good people all the time, even if they aren’t publicly posting about hiring
  • It’s way easier than you think to stand out in the hiring process

Links:

Visit Elisheva Hinkle’s website for more info ab out how she launched her career as a marketer.

Listen:

Also listen to this on iTunesSpotifyAnchorTuneIn, and Overcast.

Full Transcript:

Isaac
Welcome to Career Crashers, where we tell the stories of those who are not content to wait around following rules and hoping for good things to happen. Great careers aren’t found. They’re forged.

It’s time to crash the party.

All right, today on Career Crashers, I’m back with Tim Chermac back again this time not to talk about his story. But the career crash story of one of your employees, Tim at Platform marketing somebody that I happened to know, Elisheva Hinkle. Tell me what and this is a great story because it’s uh, it didn’t really go right. But it still turned out okay in the end. Tell me what did Elizabeth do to get a job at Platform?

Tim
She she wanted a job, she was younger. I think when she applied, she was like 16 or 17 years old or something like that. So not even college age, but like high school age, right. And she knew that on paper, technically, she didn’t have the credentials, she wasn’t qualified in the traditional sense of, you know, having a marketing degree or, frankly, having a high school diploma.

And so she she sent a burrito to be delivered to my house because she found out you know, via some friends of friends, and I love Chipotle I loved burritos. It’s like, my passion in life. And so she didn’t just send Chipotle a gift card, she actually used one of those like delivery services and actually found out again, just by asking people what I usually order when I go to Chipotle, and she actually got my order exactly right, which is crazy. But she had it delivered. She had it delivered to my house like in person. And this guy was like ringing the doorbell.

And at the time, my wife was home. I was off like working in a co-working space for the day. So I wasn’t home. And my wife starts calling me like three times and I was on a conference call or something. And so I couldn’t take her call. But then I realized she had called me and she had Slacked me and texted me like in like rapid fire. And I’m like, okay, that’s not normal. Something’s probably not right.

So I quick hopped off the conference call. And I called her and she’s like, Tim, someone’s outside the door. And they keep knocking and ringing the doorbell. I don’t know what. And she was like afraid that someone was trying to break in or something. I’m like, well, this is weird, because it’s like 3pm on a Friday afternoon, right? Like, usually someone’s not gonna bust in, you know, right in the middle of the day.

But she’s like, freaking out. And so she’s like hiding in the back room. And then she creeps to the front door after this person left. And there’s like a box at the front door. And she didn’t know what it is. You know, I didn’t know what it was. She was asked me Did you order anything? Was there like no, and it’s not like a box like from FedEx or Amazon Prime or something. It’s kind of like a nondescript looking package on the front door. Like a you know, it’s a bomb or something. So she was convinced like someone left like, explosive. And it’s like one of those random serial killer murders.

And by the way, all this is happening because I don’t know when this podcast is gonna go live. But a couple years ago, there were these like package bombs in Austin, Texas, right? where people were getting packages delivered.

Isaac
That’s right. Yeah!

Tim
It killed some people. People were putting bombs and packages and people died. And so this was all like, right happening in the aftermath of that. So my wife’s like, Oh, my god, someone’s trying to like bomb us because it’s not a FedEx. It’s not Amazon Prime, whatever. And I’m like, Okay, well don’t open it. Just stay in the back.

And so she’s literally barricaded herself, and our dogs in like the farthest back corner of the house. Because she’s like, Alright, that’s out of the blast radius. If it blows up, then, you know, I’ll probably survive with minor injuries.

And I come home. And I’m like, just creeping towards it kind of like, well, I don’t I have no idea what this is. But someone has to open it. So I like opens it up. And inside this box is a bag with like a Chipotle a burrito. And I’m like, still, I have no context. I have no idea what the hell is going on? I don’t know who it’s from. Like, why there’s Chipotle delivered to our house. I didn’t order it. She obviously didn’t order it. And so like a reasonable person probably just would have like, thrown it away. But I like Chipotle, so…

Isaac
You would put your life on the line for that burrito?

Tim
Oh, yeah. Right. It totally could have been poisoned, like the risk reward of that, like I was making enough money at the time to if I really wanted Chipotle I could have gone and got it myself.

But I risked my life to eat this burrito that was left on my doorstep. And so anyways, I found out later and email came like half an hour later saying that hey, you know, Hey, my name is Elisheva. I think I pronounced it right. I just sent you a burrito. I hope you enjoy it. I wanted to grab your attention in a creative way. Because I know that you know you love Chipotle, I’d like to interview for a job at Platform.

I’m willing to work a month for free. Just to prove prove how valuable that I can be for your company. And I was like holy cow, if someone wants to work at our company that bad, where they’re willing to like, find out where I live, do some researching and digging and find out what I even order at Chipotle and send a burrito to our house as funny as it is, in hindsight, like we thought we were being attacked by terrorists.

What a creative way to get my attention, get a job. And she, I mean, that’s that that’s so creative. And that that whole, like, strategy of grabbing my attention was so creative, that it almost takes away from how brilliant her email was. And that’s, I’m willing to work for you for free for a month to prove my value.

And I think that’s actually very underrated as a tactic for young people trying to get their foot in the door at a company because what the public doesn’t really understand about hiring is that it’s, it’s actually less of a big deal being willing to work for free than you probably think because most of that first bugs were just training you anyways, you’re actually not even adding any value to the company.

Because there’s not a lot of things you can do at most companies where you can come in and add value. And so for the greater part of that first month, we were just training her anyways, and she wasn’t really adding value. But we kind of made a decision that, hey, if she was willing to send the burrito, she’s willing to work for free. Like, let’s just start training her and we’ll probably know by the end of that first month, if she’s going to work out anyways.

Isaac
Did you have a job opening posted publicly?

Tim
Now we’ve actually never in the history of the company said we’re hiring. We weren’t either. We weren’t hiring but when someone good that, you know that good comes along, it’s like, I guess I’ll increase the payroll a little bit even if we did technically need that person then because if someone’s that good, and they want to work for us that bad.

Isaac
Yeah. I talked to business owners all the time, who say it doesn’t matter if we have job postings up or not. If I meet people that I think are valuable, I am always willing to hire. So I took down a few bullets on this one.

And Elisheva did some research. She she happen to know some people that worked at the company and asking around what you know, learned about you seeing you posted on social media about guacamole and Chipotle, made it personal.

Tim
I was in the Chipotle and into guacamole before it was cool to like like avocados and be a millennial and all that like…

Isaac
Oh I know! I think you created the avocado trend.

Tim
I just want to put that on the record.

Isaac
And Elisheva, even though in this case, like you know, it could’ve, it didn’t go right the first impression didn’t quite hit, the fact that she made it personal and figured out like, What do you care about, I always tell people this that the the career market, it’s like dating, you don’t go to somebody you want to date and be like, here are 10 reasons I’m highly dateable to women or to men.

You go and you think about this specific person, here’s why you are fascinating to me, why I’m interested in you. Employers are people too, and saying, I’m interested in you, your company rather than here’s me and why I’m a good person that any company would like.

So she went for you. And she made herself, she was persistent as well with the calls and emails, but she made herself hard to say no to by making that offer. Let me work for free for a month. And this is something I tell people a lot, even offering it, what that signals is so powerful. A lot of times the employer will say, Well, now let’s just bring you on and pay you anyway. It’s not that much of a difference.

They don’t, they don’t even always do it. It’s not like employers are sitting there being like, ooh, I’ll squeeze a month of free work out of you. Right? Like that’s not that high of a value, but it’s recognizing anything you can do to make it hard to say no to you. Like that’s a really hard person to say no to. They persisted. They did something for you. They sent you a nice email, they said give me a chance for free for a month. Like, what what objections do you have left? It’s pretty tough to say no to that.

Tim
Yeah. And it’s actually not enough to remove risk too. Because like I said, a lot of people go, I’ll take the risk out, I’ll be willing to work for free or whatever.

But just again, to restate it from the business owners, the entrepreneurs perspective. We spend most of that first month just training them anyway. So it actually consumes our team’s resources. It’s almost a net negative for our company in that first month because we have to train them.

Now, Elisheva ended up being such a great employee that it absolutely worked out to a win-win. We recently just offered her a full time salaried position. And so she went from coming in working for free initially, we offered her a part time job paid hourly, you know, and now we just offer a full time salaried position. And so it’s absolutely worked out.

But just realize that it’s not enough to send a resume somewhere you actually have to be willing to add add value to that to that company. And Isaac, you said we weren’t even hiring at that point. But how how can I say no to that?

Isaac
So after you got the the burrito bomb and the email with the value proposition, and was your next thought, can I see your GPA And your degree?

Tim
No, no, I mean, I don’t care about it. We’ve actually, I shouldn’t say we’ve never asked because one thing we almost always do in a phone interview is after we’ve talked to someone for like 90 minutes, and we’ve vetted them, and we’ve basically made the decision like, Hey, we’re gonna hire this person.

On the last interview, I mean, after we’ve discussed, you know, compensation and all that stuff, we’ll be like, by the way, what was your high school GPA? And we say it in a dead serious face, but we don’t care. We’re saying it as a joke. And it’s always funny seeing how people react, because they’re, oh, well, I mean, honestly, I didn’t study too hard in high school, and they start making all these excuses. And we’re just kidding. We don’t care. We like love doing that.

Isaac
That’s almost mean. It’s funny. I don’t remember where the story was. And I had to track it down. But the burrito story reminds me there was somebody at a startup maybe in Austin that I met or heard about, who did something similar. He actually dressed up as a taco delivery guy, and just showed up to the office saying, Hey, I got tacos for everybody. And nobody had ordered them and brought them into the lunch room. And then like, had a pitch, hey, I’m a graphic designer, whatever, here’s my portfolio, I want to work for you. And then ended up working.

Now again, you know, if you send somebody a cake or whatever it doesn’t, it’s not always gonna work. It can be creepy. It can go off wrong, you got to combine a couple things.

Tim
The whole point is that Lish had researched and found out that I personally liked Chipotle. So obviously, the lesson here isn’t to just send burritos to people you want jobs from. She saw that I was obsessed with Chipotle. So obviously, she customized it to me.

But what’s interesting is, obviously, I went and posted this on social media. I’ve shared the story with, you know, hundreds of people before, and yet this was a couple years ago. Maybe it’s last year. I don’t know. No one has done it since.

Isaac
Right?

Tim
Even though we’ve hired many people. Since Lish, no one has done it since. And so it’s pretty easy to stand out. If you just prove that you want that specific job. You know, you’re not just spamming a resume out to a bunch of people but you’re willing to go above and beyond because you want to work at this specific company. It’s it’s really hard to say no to that.

Isaac
The bar is pretty low when it comes to bypassing the typical processes and you know, crashing the market.

One of my favorite examples is Nina for Airbnb, this woman that wanted to work at Airbnb, she just created a landing page, Nina for Airbnb. And she put together like a short PDF study of international markets. And it was it was for Airbnb exclusively. Here’s where you can break into this market this, this and this, give me a call. Because if I apply like everyone else, I won’t get noticed.

The thing is, she didn’t get hired by Airbnb, she ended up getting flooded with other companies wanting to hire. So even though the company she put in the work for, it’s also a signal like, Whoa, if she’s willing to do that for them, I want her to channel that same passion for me. It’s it’s broader than you might think.

So hey, Tim, thanks again for joining us, man.

Tim
Cool, thanks, Isaac!

Isaac
Later!

Like what you hear? Go to crash.co and join the career revolution. If you want to share your own career crash story, send it directly to me at isaac@crash.co.


You can stay up-to-date on every Career Crasher episode as it launches here. Plus, if you’ve got a story or know someone who we should feature, don’t forget to email us!

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